Monday, 22 June 2015

Wales' Need A Say Not Only In BritExiit But Any EU Reforms

In today's Wasting Mule Online,  Plaid Leader Leanne  Wood says the needs of Wales are different to the rest of the UK but much of the talk around reforms suggests Wales is out of the picture


She says that sections of Welsh economy would struggle if some reforms went ahead, and that the needs of the country are different to the rest of the UK.
She told Mr Cameron: 
“Reform of the EU is needed. I disagree with some of the reforms you are proposing but I agree that it makes sense to try and secure a consensus on any changes.”
She said that as Plaid leader “it is incumbent upon me to ensure that the views of Wales and people here are given full consideration during the discussions on the series of reforms you are seeking.”


Ms Wood said much of the talk surrounding EU reforms suggests Wales is not being considered.


“If this persists, Wales will continue to be the on the fringe of the debate on EU reforms despite the fact that this process has many far-reaching consequences for Wales’ future,” she wrote.
 The needs of Wales, in many ways, are different to the UK’s. Immigration levels, for example, are much lower in Wales than other parts of the UK.“Sections of the Welsh economy would struggle if some of the mooted reforms go ahead.
“An example of these differences is highlighted in research which shows that Wales is a net beneficiary of EU membership. An exit would be financially destructive for many Welsh communities that receive much of the EU money in the form of grants.
“It would also be detrimental to much of the trade in Wales. The same is true of Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) payments to farmers in Wales as EU funding through the CAP accounts for 80% of farm income in Wales, and supports over 16,000 farmers.
“Some communities in Wales are among the poorest in Western Europe so we can ill-afford even further cuts.”
There is a tendency on the Left  to decry such support for farmers particularly as they often are sen as natural Tory supporters  but maybe its time they reevaluated their position after all Ceredigion was Radical before the Rhondda was Red

And Ceredigion and the Rhondda are some  of the poorest parts of the Europe let alone the  UK

Its time the plight of our Rural communities became a cause for the Left and linked to yhat of the Urban poor


In much of the UK, people's incomes are well below the EU average - in some areas by as much as a third. In the map (above) Britain's poorest regions are highlighted, showing how far below the European average incomes have fallen. The Cornish, for example, are 36 per cent less well-off than the EU norm. Families in Slovenia meanwhile are just 16 per cent poorer - and in Portugal 23 per cent.
In much of the UK, people's incomes are well below the EU average - in some areas by as much as a third. In the map (above) Britain's poorest regions are highlighted, showing how far below the European average incomes have fallen. 


Ms Wood also reiterated her call for votes in each nation of the United Kingdom to be “tallied separately” so a EU exit can only take place with the agreement of Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and England together.
If we are a family of nations, as was declared on many occasions in last year’s referendum on Scottish independence, then this is something that should be considered as a matter of course,” 
It is imperative that Wales have  say in whether the UK leaves the EU or not  but also in any concessions   Cameron may  obtain from our EU partners.

The danger is not only tie UK leaving the EU but finding that Cameron has pushed forward "Reforms" that benefit London and the South East to the detriment of the rest of the UK.

Wales may well vote in a very similar way to the majority of  the UK but we need to know what happens if we say NO to a BritExit only to find ourselves  under the worst scenario of a rampant bullying Westminster and City of London who could further beggar us.

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